6.17.17

In twenty short years Japan had risen from the ashes of World War II to become an international powerhouse in manufacturing and technology. The New York World's Fair was their opportunity to display those accomplishments in a pavilion of remarkable beauty. Join nywf64.com on a visit to the Pavilion of Japan.




The description of this exhibit from the 1964 Official Guide Book

Cover- 1964 Guidebook

The description of this exhibit from the 1965 Official Guide Book

Cover - 1965 Guidebook

The location of this exhibit on the 1964 Official Souvenir Map

Cover - 1964 Official Souvenir Map

JAPAN

Rockets for space research, model trains and tea ceremonies, and an array of consumer products are part of a presentation which emphasizes the differences between the new Japan and the old. Side by side with some of the world's most advanced microscopes, cameras, automobiles and industrial machines are charming evidences of the quiet, cultured but totally nonindustrial Japan of only 100 years ago. The pavilion buildings combine the graceful architecture of ancient Japan with contemporary designs. On an outdoor stage, fireworks, Judo tournaments, fashion shows and dance programs are scheduled. There are two Japanese restaurants, an American-style snack bar, and a roof garden serving Japanese beer.

* Admission: free.
 Highlights 

A CENTURY OF PROGRESS. Japan's rapid emergence as an industrial nation is shown in photographs of Tokyo as it is now and as it was 100 years ago, just after U.S. Commodore Matthew Perry opened the nation to trade with the West. Examples of current scientific and industrial progress are shown in many exhibits. Among them:

Probers of space. Japanese-made rockets hang prominently in the center of the building. A portable planetarium which projects man-made satellites as well as the solar system is on display.
New tools of science share another display. An electron microscope is shown which can photograph the smallest particles of matter, enlarging them two million times. Near it is a newly developed motion picture camera that can take one million frames per second.
Symbols of industry include a replica of the world's largest tanker, the Nissho Maru (132,200 tons), and a scale model of the world's fastest express train (160 miles per hour). An elaborate miniature railroad system emphasizes Japan's railroading skills.
THE NEW JAPAN. The second building, reached by a ramp from the first, offers an array of consumer goods - sports cars, motorcycles, frozen foods, sewing machines - plus demonstrations of flower arranging and the ritualistic Japanese tea ceremony. A model rocket gives the visitor who steps inside it the sensation of space travel. At the press of a button, an electronic computer provides information on how to get almost anywhere in the world. A stand sells Japanese made products, including color TV sets.
RESTAURANTS. In the third building, called the House of Japan, are the two restaurants, which serve foods such as sukiyaki and tempura. The first, on the main floor, caters to diners who prefer Western tables and chairs. The second, on a mezzanine, serves meals the Japanese way - on low tables with the diners sitting on straw mats. Diners at both may see stage shows which present glimpses of Japanese theater and dance.

JAPAN

Executive aircraft, cameras and a high-speed computer share space with ancient tea ceremonies behind a finely sculptured stone wall.

Side by side with some of the world's most advanced microscopes and industrial machines are charming evidences of the quiet rural Japan of a century ago. Judo tournaments, fashion shows and dance programs are held on an outdoor stage. There are also a restaurant, a snack bar and a roof garden that serves Japanese beer.

CENTURY OF PROGRESS. Photographs of Tokyo as it is today, reflect the emergence of Japan into the industrial age.

A Japanese-made private plane hangs in the center of the building. Nearby is a movie camera that can take one million frames per second.

A replica of the Nissho Maru, one of the world's largest tankers, is on display, along with a scale model of the world's fastest express train. An elaborate miniature railroad system emphasizes Japan's transportation skills.

THE NEW JAPAN. Displays of consumer goods such as sports cars, motorcycles, cameras and sewing machines are housed in a second building. Demonstrations of the tea ceremony and flower-arranging techniques are given.
RESTAURANTS. In a third building, Japanese dishes such as sukiyaki and tempura are served. Patrons may choose between Western service or the ritual of Japanese-style dining, in which guests sit on mats around low tables.

Admission: free.

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